Light Painting Kuna Cave

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April 5, 2009

Hunter and I having scouted it first, the ladies decide to join us for another foray into the dark and dusty Kuna Cave.

Happy birthday
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Happy birthday
http://flickr.com/photos/trailimage/12864103495

Having seen the photographs of our last trip,¹ Laura wanted to visit Kuna Cave on her birthday. And having learned from last time, we’ve come prepared with filtration masks.

  1. Trail Image, “Finding Kuna Cave”: trailimage.com/finding-kuna-cave
Decline
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Decline
http://flickr.com/photos/trailimage/12864193303
Looking up
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Looking up
http://flickr.com/photos/trailimage/12864117645

After driving some thirty minutes from home to the unmarked middle of a field, we descend in a caged ladder fifty feet from the barren surface to the dark and dusty environs of a cave formed not of water, stalactite dripping to stalagmite, but fire coursing through the earth.

Shaking off the dust
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Shaking off the dust
http://flickr.com/photos/trailimage/12864550284
Beam me up
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Beam me up
http://flickr.com/photos/trailimage/12864212493

The bright spring sun creates an almost tangible shaft of light within the cave’s lingering dust, making credible an early belief “that the cave, which is said to be one of rare beauty in its formation, will be set aside by the government for the public use.”¹ But that has yet to happen.

  1. Idaho Statesman, “Would Preserve Wonders of Kuna Cave” (May 12, 1911)
Outline of Laura
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Outline of Laura
http://flickr.com/photos/trailimage/12864219553

At the end of the walkable series of northern chambers, we stop for some light painting, a fun exercise well known to the children of photo enthusiasts.

Optimistic proportions
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Optimistic proportions
http://flickr.com/photos/trailimage/12864225523
Smile
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Smile
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Having seen enough of it last time, I’m content to let the kids explore the tunnels beneath the rainbow. We watch their light receding into the small dusty hole.

Brood
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Brood
http://flickr.com/photos/trailimage/12864157365

The [Snake] river is five miles away and [Surveyor] General Utter is of the opinion that there is an opening all the way to the river … ‘From the fact that there is a strong, wet breeze blowing from one direction and a hot, dry breeze blowing from another, it is apparent that there are two other openings in the cave, one to the river and another to the plainland.’¹

Early accounts of Kuna Cave exploration describe a steady breeze that would blow out visitors’ candles. When the Army Corps of Engineers blasted shut the cave’s further reaches (I can find no firsthand references) the air fell still and dust lingered.

While the kids are finding their way through the dust on hands and knees, Jessica and I hang back in relative comfort and take pictures of ourselves.

  1. Idaho Statesman, “Would Preserve Wonders of Kuna Cave” (May 12, 1911)
It says “Selaah”
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It says “Selaah”
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Not too bad
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Not too bad
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Dust out
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Dust out
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In addition to wearing masks this time, I also brought a purpose-made clear plastic wrap for the camera. I recommend it.

Something about a broken arm
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Something about a broken arm
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Back at the ladder, I ask for some family poses. Hunter needs a little help climbing with his arm in a cast.

Signs
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Signs
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Human remains found on these rock shelves near the entrance when the cave was first explored in 1890¹ were thought to be those of a Native American, banished or lost. A formal survey concluded otherwise.

There is a popular belief in the district that the Indians used the cave as a burial place but investigations made by the party of [United States Surveyor] engineers which went from here establishes the more probable theory that the body found … was that of a white man who had climbed the shelf after having vainly tried to find other means of escape.²

  1. Idaho Statesman, “Interesting Story of Exploration of Kuna Cave by Party in 1890” (May 18, 1911).
  2. Idaho Statesman, “Would Preserve Wonders of Kuna Cave” (May 12, 1911)
Pigpen
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Pigpen
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Hallelujah
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Hallelujah
http://flickr.com/photos/trailimage/12864220625

With a final pose, we call it a day. Happy birthday Laura, you nut.